Tall tea caddy, Oribe style

citation

Light buff clay. String-cut base. Wheel-thrown shape flattened on opposing sides by squeezing, vertical and horizontal carving, and slashing; deep bevel around foot. Mark, “X,” incised on base. Iron-tinted ash glaze, appearing khaki brown where thick, dark matte brown where thin at edges and where wiped off intentionally; glossy brown iron glaze applied to neck, running irregularly down body. Inside unglazed. Weight:161.62 grams.

Historical period(s)
Momoyama period, 1607-1615
Medium
Stoneware with wood-ash and iron glazes; ivory lid.
Style
Mino ware
Dimensions
H x W x D: 10.2 x 5.7 x 5.7 cm (4 x 2 1/4 x 2 1/4 in)
Geography
Japan, Gifu prefecture, Toki city, Kujiri village, Motoyashiki kiln
Credit Line
Gift of Charles Lang Freer
Accession Number
F1901.90a-b
On View Location
Currently not on view
Classification(s)
Ceramic, Vessel
Type

Tea caddy (chaire)

Keywords
Japan, Mino ware, Momoyama period (1573 - 1615), stoneware, tea
Provenance

To 1901
Japanese Trading Company, New York to 1901 [1]

From 1901 to 1919
Charles Lang Freer (1854-1919), purchased from Japanese Trading Company in 1901 [2]

From 1920
Freer Gallery of Art, gift of Charles Lang Freer in 1920 [3]

Notes:

[1] See Original Pottery List, L. 974, Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives.

[2] See note 1.

[3] The original deed of Charles Lang Freer's gift was signed in 1906. The collection was received in 1920 upon the completion of the Freer Gallery.

Previous Owner(s)

Charles Lang Freer 1854-1919
Japanese Trading Company (C.L. Freer source)

Description

Light buff clay. String-cut base. Wheel-thrown shape flattened on opposing sides by squeezing, vertical and horizontal carving, and slashing; deep bevel around foot. Mark, "X," incised on base. Iron-tinted ash glaze, appearing khaki brown where thick, dark matte brown where thin at edges and where wiped off intentionally; glossy brown iron glaze applied to neck, running irregularly down body. Inside unglazed. Weight:161.62 grams.

Marking(s)

Incised on the base is a mark shaped like an "X". Various marks appear on Mino wares of the early seventeenth century. Once interpreted as potter's marks, they are now believed to be the marks of the urban merchants of tea utensils who placed special orders for certain pieces (Fujioka 1977: 156-58).

Published References
  • Louise Allison Cort. Seto and Mino Ceramics. Washington and Honolulu, 1992. cat. 42, p. 115.
  • Edwards Park. Treasures from the Smithsonian Institution., 1st ed. Washington and New York. p. 357.
Collection Area(s)
Japanese Art
Web Resources
Google Cultural Institute
Rights Statement

Copyright with museum