Stamp seal

citation

Ellipsoid shaped stamp seal with engraved design of a bearded male bust in right profile. A diadem separates parallel lines of hair on crown from face, pointed beard indicated with fine lines. The male bust is supported by a wing like base that is typical for more elaborate portrait busts in Sasanian glyptics. Unconnected double-line border above head. While plenty of male portrait busts are known on seals and impressions on sealings or bullae excavated at sites like Takht-e Sulaiman and Qasr Abu Nasr it is doubtful whether there is any real portrait character intended. Seals like this were a standard social convention.

Historical period(s)
Sasanian period, 224-651
Medium
Agate
Dimensions
H x W x D: 2.5 × 2 × 1.9 cm (1 × 13/16 × 3/4 in)
Geography
Iran
Credit Line
Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Leonard Gorelick
Accession Number
F1999.6.49
On View Location
Currently not on view
Classification(s)
Tool and Equipment
Type

Seal

Keywords
ellipsoid-shaped seal, head, Iran, man, Sasanian period (ca. 224 - 651), stamp seal, WWII-era provenance
Provenance

From prior to 1973 to 1999
Dr. and Mrs. Leonard Gorelick, Chevy Chase, Maryland, acquired by Dr. Leonard Gorelick before 1973. [1]

From 1999
Freer Gallery of Art, gift of Dr. and Mrs. Leonard Gorelick, Chevy Chase, Maryland. [2]

Notes:

[1] See Curatorial Remark 5 in the object record.

[2] See Deed of Gift, copy in object file, Collections Management Office.

Previous Owner(s)

Dr. and Mrs. Leonard Gorelick

Description

Ellipsoid shaped stamp seal with engraved design of a bearded male bust in right profile. A diadem separates parallel lines of hair on crown from face, pointed beard indicated with fine lines. The male bust is supported by a wing like base that is typical for more elaborate portrait busts in Sasanian glyptics. Unconnected double-line border above head. While plenty of male portrait busts are known on seals and impressions on sealings or bullae excavated at sites like Takht-e Sulaiman and Qasr Abu Nasr it is doubtful whether there is any real portrait character intended. Seals like this were a standard social convention.

Collection Area(s)
Ancient Near Eastern Art
Web Resources
Google Cultural Institute
Rights Statement

Copyright with museum