Bowl with stamped and incised decoration

citation

1. (Louise A. Cort and Grace W. Kaynor, intern, 6 October 1996) Bowl with alternating bands of stamped and incised decoration, inlaid with white slip, on both interior and exterior. Body with high sides, wide mouth, and everted lip rests on small high foot. Foot quickly trimmed leaving ridges in hollow.

Clay: Dark gray stoneware.

Glaze: Thin, colorless glaze applied to interior, exterior and foot. Glaze has worn away, possibly due to burial. Rust-colored patches present on sides and base as well as on foot.

Decoration: The interior well features a central full-face chrysanthemum surrounded by radiating lines of “rope-curtain” pattern ending in butterfiles, leaning slightly clockwise and irregularly spaced. An incised triple-line band separates the center motif from a narrow band of lotus leaves whose petal tips point outward, touching the inner of two incised lines. Tightly-spaced rope-curtain pattern fills the cavetto, defined at the top by triple incised lines beneath a border of incised grass pattern just under the rim. The exterior features the rope-curtain pattern bordered on each side by incised lines.

Historical period(s)
Joseon period, 15th century or later
Medium
Stoneware with white inlay under transparent glaze
Style
Buncheong ware
Dimensions
H x W x D: 8.9 x 18.6 x 18.6 cm (3 1/2 x 7 5/16 x 7 5/16 in)
Geography
Korea
Credit Line
Gift of Mrs. Maureen R. Jacoby in memory of Rolf Jacoby
Accession Number
F1991.85
On View Location
Currently not on view
Type

Bowl

Keywords
Buncheong ware
Provenance

From 1947-1950 to 1991
Mr. Rolf R. Jacoby (died 1989) and Mrs. Maureen R. Jacoby (died 2002), Centreville, MD and Washington, D.C., acquired by Rolf R. Jacoby in Korea between 1947-1950 [1]

From 1991
Freer Gallery of Art, given by Mrs. Maureen R. Jacoby in 1991 [2]

Notes:

[1] "This object, along with the others given with it, was acquired by Rolf Jacoby, the donor's late husband, in Korea between 1947 and 1950, while he served as a diplomat" (according to a note by Kate Theimer, November 28, 1995, in the object record).

[2] See note 1.

Description

1. (Louise A. Cort and Grace W. Kaynor, intern, 6 October 1996) Bowl with alternating bands of stamped and incised decoration, inlaid with white slip, on both interior and exterior. Body with high sides, wide mouth, and everted lip rests on small high foot. Foot quickly trimmed leaving ridges in hollow.

Clay: Dark gray stoneware.

Glaze: Thin, colorless glaze applied to interior, exterior and foot. Glaze has worn away, possibly due to burial. Rust-colored patches present on sides and base as well as on foot.

Decoration: The interior well features a central full-face chrysanthemum surrounded by radiating lines of "rope-curtain" pattern ending in butterfiles, leaning slightly clockwise and irregularly spaced. An incised triple-line band separates the center motif from a narrow band of lotus leaves whose petal tips point outward, touching the inner of two incised lines. Tightly-spaced rope-curtain pattern fills the cavetto, defined at the top by triple incised lines beneath a border of incised grass pattern just under the rim. The exterior features the rope-curtain pattern bordered on each side by incised lines.

Label

1. (Louise A. Cort and Grace W. Kaynor, intern, 6 October 1996) This bowl is an example of the subcategory of Choson period punch'ong stoneware known as inhwa punch'ong, which makes use of white slip inlay in carved or stamped patterns. This form of punch'ong was at its height of production in the fifteenth century, and numerous variations on the same essential design exist. Some replace the lotus petal band with small wild chrysanthemums (British Museum, Treasures from Korea: Art Through 5000 Years, 1984, no. 173); on some the butterflies fly freely, unattached to the rope-curtain chains (op.cit.); on others a bouquet of large chrysanthemums fills the well (Masterpieces of Punch'ong Ware from the the Ho-Am Art Museum, 1993, no. 70). The visual effect differs markedly depending on the density and regularity of the rope-curtain motif and the thickness of the remaining white slip.

Some bowls of this type were made for use in provincial government offices and are so identified by the characters for the office names incised in evenly spaced roundels on the outside of the bowl (ibid., nos. 79, 81; Ewha Women's University Gallery, Special Exhibition of Punch'ong Wares in Choson Period, 1984, no. 87, with the name of an office in Chinju).

Media changed from "Glazed stoneware clay, white slip" to "Stoneware, white inlay, colorless glaze." Date changed from "15th-16th century" to "15th century." Subject changed from "Bowl" to "Bowl with stamped and incised decoration and white inlay under colorless glaze."

2. (Louise A. Cort, exhibition label text, "Korean Ceramics", Gallery 9, February 1997) A wooden stamp carved with a row of circles was pressed repeatedly over the surface of this bowl to create the dense ground pattern typical of inlaid punch'ong ware bowls. Many bowls of this sort, exported to Japan, became popular as tea bowls.

3. (Louise Cort, 30 April 2004) Medium changed from "Stoneware, white inlay, colorless glaze" to "Stoneware with white slip inlay under colorless glaze."

4. (Louise Cort, 1 December 2005) According to Dr. Katayama Mabi, curator, Museum of Oriental Ceramics, Osaka, the combination of patterns on this bowl is strange and stiff, the clay body is hard, and the foot is small for the bowl's size. She suspects this may be a 20th century work.

5. (Jeffrey Smith, Louise Cort, and Soo Yeon Park, 26 July 2010) As of this date, the romanization of Korean period names, place names, and ware names in the ID-related fields of TMS is changed from the McCune Reischauer (MR) system to the Revised Romanization of Korean (RR) system, established in 2000 by the Ministry of Culture, Republic of Korea. From this point onward, new curatorial comments, exhibition labels, and other entries should use the RR system. Previous curatorial comments have not been revised.

6. (Louise Cort, 16 November 2012) I was shown a closely related bowl acquited in Korea in the mid-1960s by parents of the present owner. In particular, the treatment of the foot was the same.

To Date 15th century added "or later."

Web Resources
Whistler's Neighborhood
Google Cultural Institute
Rights Statement

Copyright with museum