Dish with enamel decoration

citation

Historical period(s)
Jin dynasty, 13th century
Medium
Stoneware with white slip under colorless transparent glaze, enamels over glaze
Style
Cizhou ware
Dimensions
H x W: 3.2 x 12.9 cm (1 1/4 x 5 1/16 in)
Geography
China
Credit Line
Purchase — Charles Lang Freer Endowment
Accession Number
F1956.23
On View Location
Currently not on view
Classification(s)
Ceramic, Vessel
Type

Dish

Keywords
China, chrysanthemum, Cizhou ware, Jin dynasty (1115 - 1234), stoneware, WWII-era provenance
Provenance

To 1956
Howard Hollis & Company, Cleveland, Ohio. [1]

From 1956
Freer Gallery of Art, purchased from Howard Hollis & Company, Cleveland, Ohio. [2]

Notes:

[1] Curatorial Remark 1 in the object record.

[2] See note 1.

Previous Owner(s)

Howard Hollis and Company

Label

This dish represents a technical breakthrough achieved by Cizhou potters around 1200. Hitherto it had not been possible to combine the high-fired stoneware with bright decorative colors, which are best produced from low-fired glazes fluxed with lead. The potters devised the method whereby the slipped stoneware covered with a transparent colorless glaze was fired to the normal high temperature, and the polychrome lead-glazed design painted on top of the glaze afterwards. The piece was fired a second time to a lower temperature, sufficient to fuse the lead glaze to the prefired dish. This technique assumed the utmost importance during the Ming (1368-1644) and Qing (1644-1911) dynasties.

Collection Area(s)
Chinese Art
Web Resources
Google Cultural Institute
Rights Statement

Copyright with museum