Folio from a Qur’an, sura 58:1-4

citation

Detached folio from a dispersed copy of the Qur’an; recto: Sura al-Mujadila (the Pleading woman) 58: part of 1and 2, one column, 3 lines of text with two lines in illuminated title- bands; verso: sura 58:2-4, one column, 7 lines; Arabic in black muhaqqaq script with white headings in thuluth script, the word “Allah” in gold muhaqqaq script; illuminated rosette verse markers; marginal roundels; vocalized in black with red letters for recitation; one of a group of 3 folios.
Border: The recto is set in an illuminated border; the verso is set in gold and black rulings on cream-colored paper.

Historical period(s)
Mamluk period, 14th century
Medium
Ink, color and gold on paper
Dimensions
H x W: 36.9 x 27 cm (14 1/2 x 10 5/8 in)
Geography
Egypt
Credit Line
Purchase — Charles Lang Freer Endowment
Accession Number
F1932.61
On View Location
Currently not on view
Classification(s)
Manuscript
Type

Detached manuscript folio

Keywords
Egypt, illumination, Islam, Mamluk period (1250 - 1517), muhaqqaq script, Qur'an, sura 58, thuluth script
Provenance

To 1932
Hagop Kevorkian (1872-1962), New York. [1]

From 1932
Freer Gallery of Art, purchased from Hagop Kevorkian, New York. [2]

Notes:

[1] Curatorial Remark 1 in the object record. See also Freer Gallery of Art Purchase List after 1920, Collections Management Office.

[2] See note 1.

Previous Owner(s)

Hagop Kevorkian 1872 - 1962

Description

Detached folio from a dispersed copy of the Qur'an; recto: Sura al-Mujadila (the Pleading woman) 58: part of 1and 2, one column, 3 lines of text with two lines in illuminated title- bands; verso: sura 58:2-4, one column, 7 lines; Arabic in black muhaqqaq script with white headings in thuluth script, the word "Allah" in gold muhaqqaq script; illuminated rosette verse markers; marginal roundels; vocalized in black with red letters for recitation; one of a group of 3 folios.
Border: The recto is set in an illuminated border; the verso is set in gold and black rulings on cream-colored paper.

Label

With the rapid geographic spread of Islam, the need for more legible and transcribable styles of writing became paramount. One of the most popular of these scripts was muhaqqaq, recognizable by its slender verticals and rounded, shallow sublinear strokes.
This folio (F1932.61) in muhaqqaq is inscribed with the first two verses of chapter 53, entitled al-Mujadilat (She who disputes). Reportedly, a woman complained to the Prophet that her husband had locked her away for no apparent reason. Soon after, Muhammad received a revelation urging the acceptance of a woman's plea on behalf of herself and her children and condemning the degradation of her position. The message illustrates the importance of the Qur'an not only as a spiritual guide but also as a moral one. The chapter begins as follows:
God has indeed heard (and accepted) the statement
Of the woman who pleads with thee concerning her husband
And carries her complaint in prayer to God
And God always hears the arguments between both
Sides among you: for God hears and sees (all things).

Published References
  • Fereshteh Daftari. Without Boundary: Seventeen Ways of Looking. Exh. cat. New York, February 26 - May 22, 2006. p. 11, fig. 1.
  • Islamic Art and Patronage: Treasures from Kuwait. Exh. cat. New York. pp.166, 167,169.
Collection Area(s)
Arts of the Islamic World
Web Resources
Google Cultural Institute
Rights Statement

Copyright with museum

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