Seven Scholars Going through the Pass

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Maker(s)
Artist: Formerly attributed to Li Tang 李唐 (ca. 1050s-after 1130)
Calligrapher: Frontispiece by Cheng Nanyun (ca. 1400-ca. 1450)
Historical period(s)
Ming dynasty, early 15th century
Medium
Ink and color on silk
Dimensions
H x W (image): 25.7 x 170 cm (10 1/8 x 66 15/16 in)
Geography
China
Credit Line
Gift of Charles Lang Freer
Accession Number
F1916.184
On View Location
Freer Gallery 13: Looking Out, Looking In: Art in Late Imperial China
Classification(s)
Painting
Type

Handscroll

Keywords
China, horse, landscape, Ming dynasty (1368 - 1644), mule, ox, scholar, travel
Provenance

To 1916
Li Wenqing (late 19th-early 20th century), Shanghai, to 1916 [1]

From 1916 to 1919
Charles Lang Freer (1854-1919), purchased from Li Wenqing, in New York, in 1916 [2]

From 1920
Freer Gallery of Art, gift of Charles Lang Freer in 1920 [3]

Notes:

[1] See Original Kakemono and Makimono List, L. 1029, Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. This object exhibits seals, colophons, or inscriptions that could provide additional information regarding the object’s history; see Curatorial Remarks in the object record for further details.

[2] See note 1.

[3] The original deed of Charles Lang Freer's gift was signed in 1906. The collection was received in 1920 upon the completion of the Freer Gallery.

Previous Owner(s)

Charles Lang Freer 1854-1919
Li Wenqing (C.L. Freer source) ca. 1869 - 1931

Label

Accompanied by a small group of retainers on foot, seven gentlemen riding mules, horses, and an ox leave behind the gate of a pass and casually proceed along a wintry riverbank. Six of the men are dressed against the cold in identical white robes and wide-brimmed hats worn over dark shoulder-length hoods, while the seventh is clad in gray and wears an official's black cap. Some of the men turn to talk with each other, gesturing with their whips, but there is no urgency in their manner. The bundles of scrolls, umbrellas, and food utensils carried by the retainers--together with the ubiquitous wrapped qin (zither)--suggest that the group is venturing forth on a daytrip to some nearby scenic location.

Published References
  • Fu Shen, Glenn D. Lowry, Ann Yonemura, Thomas Lawton. From Concept to Context: Approaches to Asian and Islamic Calligraphy. Exh. cat. Washington. cat. 10, pp. 40-41.
  • Thomas Lawton. Chinese Figure Painting. Exh. cat. Washington, 1973. cat. 11, p. 74-76.
  • Suzuki Kei. Chugoku kaiga sogo zuroku (Comprehensive Illustrated Catalog of Chinese Painting). 5 vols., Tokyo, 1982-1983. pp. 222-223.
  • .
Collection Area(s)
Chinese Art
Web Resources
Google Cultural Institute
Rights Statement

Copyright with museum